dairy-free and egg-free cooking for pleasure

Posts tagged “beef

Home-made, dairy-free hamburgers

The raw burgers

The raw burgers

The solution to knowing exactly what is in your hamburger is to make your own. It’s neither hard, nor very expensive, as you only need about 100–125 g meat per head.

Unexpected though it may seem, a good recipe appears in the first volume of Simone Beck, Louisette Bertholle, and Julia Childs’ Mastering the Art of French Cooking, published back in 1966. It only needs slight modification for the lactose- or egg-intolerant, and I would say for the better!

In France, butchers mince the best cuts of beef. Elsewhere, since this is a dish calling for a top cut, it is advisable to buy lean steak and grind it at home, in a mincer or food-processor.

Serve with, say, baked or sauté potatoes and a green vegetable, such as cabbage with garlic and fennel seeds (see the Book), unless you want the traditional hamburger garniture, in which case dispense with deglazing the pan at the end.

  • 1 lge onion
  • olive oil
  • 400–500 g fresh minced beef, without fat
  • 2–3 sprigs or ½ tsp dried thyme
  • salt and freshly milled pepper
  • flour
  • 12.5 ml wine, red, white, or rosé

Chop the onion finely and soften it in a tablespoonful of olive oil in a frying pan in which the burgers can eventually be cooked.

Mix the onion and its oil into the mince – if it has all been absorbed, add 2–3 tsp fresh olive oil to the meat to hold the mixture together – and season with thyme leaves and salt and black pepper to taste. Work the mince into a homogeneous ball.

Flour a plate and your hands and shape your patties one by one, pressing them firmly together. Personally I prefer to make them with a diameter of about 5 cm which is smaller than the typical industrial size, but means that they are easier to handle and cook.

Fry the patties in hot oil, about 2–3 min a side if you like them well done on the outside and pink in the middle, otherwise longer, and turning the heat down once the meat is sealed.

Transfer them to a warm serving dish. Deglaze the pan with the wine, pouring it over the meat as soon as it has reduced by at least half and thickened.

The cooked burgers

The cooked burgers

 

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Beef and beer casserole – Carbonade de boeuf

The ingredients assembled

Even in Provence it gets cold, especially in the evening, and the idea of a beef and beer casserole has had particular appeal this winter, to warm the kitchen and ourselves. Finally, one got made.

Carbonade de boeuf  is traditional in Northern France and Belgium, what might be termed Flanders, an area famous for its bleak weather – and its beers. You don’t need a special beer to cook this, though one might wash it down a treat. For myself, I’d rather have a robust red wine.

Along with the brown sugar, vinegar, black peppercorns, and onion, the beer and long slow cooking make for beef that melts in the mouth while diffusing wonderful hints of all those flavours – it’s a far cry indeed from leathery, tasteless fried steak.

Lard is the traditional cooking medium, olive oil less authentic but arguably nicer. The stale bread acts as a primitive thickener, but can be omitted without problems. If you have time, cook the carbonade for as long as 3–4 hours, in a lower oven.

Baked potatoes go well especially as there should be lots of sauce. Other possible accompaniments are red cabbage and apple, or a potato, chicory, and bacon salad – for recipes for these see the Book.

  • 300–400 g onions
  • lard or olive oil
  • 800 g – 1 kg lean braising steak, in thin slices, cut on the bias, if possible
  • 1 tbsp soft brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp wine vinegar
  • 2–3 sprigs of thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • salt
  • 1 heaped tsp coarsely crushed black peppercorns
  • 500 ml light beer or lager
  • 1 slice of stale bread, optional
  • 1 tbsp strong Dijon mustard

Pre-heat the oven to gas mark 3/170°C.

Slice the onions thinly.

On top of the stove, heat enough lard or olive oil to cover the base of a heavy casserole, and brown the beef on both sides, a couple of pieces at a time, adding more fat or oil as necessary between batches.

When all the meat is done, toss the onion in the same pot, having reduced the heat and added more lard or oil, until they are soft (about 8–10 min), then stir in the brown sugar and the vinegar and cook a further 1–2 minutes, not more.

Return the beef to the pot, layering it alternately with the onion. Place the thyme and bay leaf in the middle and season with salt and the crushed peppercorns. Pour in enough beer to cover by just under 1 cm and crumble in the bread.

Cover, place in the oven, and cook for a minimum of 1½ h.

Away from the heat, work the mustard into the sauce, taste, and serve from the casserole, or, if you prefer, transfer the meat to a hot dish and keep it warm while you blend in the mustard and adjust the seasoning. Pour the finished sauce over the meat having removed the thyme and bay leaf.

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