dairy-free and egg-free cooking for pleasure

non-soya

Chocolate bark – a delicious dairy-free and gluten-free treat

This is heavenly food, and healthy too, involving nothing more than dark chocolate, dried fruit, and nuts (it is taken, with minor changes, from Food for Think, a source of good things).

The fruit and nuts may be varied as you please, for example, with candied peel or chopped almonds or something more radical such as salted cashew nuts. High-quality dark chocolate is essentialensure it doesn’t contain lactose or skimmed milk. For another idea, try Orangettes in our book.

  • 60 g dried apricots
  • 60 g hazelnuts, shelled
  • 60 g walnuts, shelled
  • 60 g sultanas or raisins – or a mixture
  • 200 g dark chocolate (e.g., Lindt 70%)

Chop the dried apricots and the nuts and mix together along with the other dried fruit.

Soften the chocolate gently in a bain-marie, that is, one saucepan, containing the chocolate roughly broken into shards, sitting in a larger pan containing water that is kept simmering over a low flame.

Meanwhile, line a baking tray with non-stick greaseproof paper. As soon as the chocolate has melted, pour it carefully on to the centre of the paper (it has a natural tendency to spread in a neat circle if you keep pouring in the same place). Starting in the middle, spoon the fruit and nut mixture evenly over the chocolate, pressing it down lightly both to embed it and to spread the chocolate out more.

Refrigerate just until the chocolate has hardened. Cut or break off wedges as required. It keeps well – if you are strong-minded.

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A Two-in-One Fish Dish, Well Almost

Fish in the Mediterranean is not plentiful, lots of minnows and small fry, respectable-sized grey mullet at some times of year, and notoriously over-fished tuna. However, you can almost always buy, and apparently without a guilty conscience, coley (lieu noir) or pollack (lieu jaune). When British fishmongers’ slabs buckled under the weight of catches, coley and pollack were somewhat despised, the former being known as cat fish. Nowadays they are still around but better appreciated: supermarkets promote them, and they are used for fish & chips in place of cod.

Both have an agreeable texture and taste and provide steaks and fillets of useful proportions, hence great versatility. Fish and potatoes have no need to prove themselves as a winning combination but this recipe for the two baked together has several virtues: it is easy, quick to prepare (though needs a bit of time in the oven), delicious while not demanding many ingredients, and can provide left-overs (they sound more elegant in French – les restes) that make for delightful fishcakes.

The main recipe is as follows:

Baked fish and (new) potatoes

  • 400–500 g (new) potatoes
  • 2–3 cloves of garlic
  • 1–2 sprigs of rosemary
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds (optional)
  • salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 400 g fish fillets (e.g. coley or pollack or other white fish)
  • ½–1 preserved lemon (optional)

Pre-heat the oven to gas mark 7/220°C.

Scrape or peel the potatoes and cut them into small wedges. Spread these over an oiled ovenproof dish and lightly coat with further olive oil. Add the garlic cloves, peeled but whole, half the rosemary, the fennel seeds, if included, and salt and pepper.

Bake, uncovered, in the centre of the hot oven for 25–30 min, turning the potato over a few times. Now turn the oven down to gas mark 5/190°C and place the fish on top of the potato. Season it with the remaining rosemary, more salt and pepper, and, highly recommended if you can get it, preserved lemon, chopped small. Splash a little oil over the fish, and the potato if necessary. Cook for about 20 min, depending on the thickness of the fish. Serve from the dish. Baked tomatoes go well and can be cooked at the same time as the fish (see Olive Oil, Garlic & Parsley – the book).

For fishcakes next day:

Mash whatever is left over and, if there is not quite enough, boil and add some potatoes. Optionally, half to a whole chopped onion can be worked in as a further binder and enlivener of flavour.

Flouring your hands liberally, press two to three tablespoons’ worth of the mixture into a round flat firm evenly dusted cake, flour your hands again and repeat. Alternatively you can work them together with spatulas.

Brown the fishcakes in hot olive oil, making sure they don’t stick to the pan or you’ll lose the crispy coating that will form.

Serve straightaway, possibly with a sauce rouille and a crunchy salad, green beans with bacon, say, or vegetable, such as carrots with capers (see Olive Oil, Garlic & Parsley – the book).

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