dairy-free and egg-free cooking for pleasure

non lactose

Crème au chocolat: an indulgent dairy-free and gluten-free pudding

Crème au chocolat 2

An easy chocolate pudding made with neither dairy nor egg, but don’t let that fool you – it’s rich, chocolatey and delicious. You can prepare it a day or two in advance, making it a perfect dish for entertaining.

  • 100 g good quality dark chocolate (dairy-free of course) such as Green and Blacks
  • 300 ml coconut cream
  • 1.5 tbsp cocoa (or to taste)
  • 2 tbsp caster sugar (or to taste)
  • 2 heaped tbsp freeze-dried raspberries (optional)
  • a handful of fresh summer fruits (optional)

Put a bain-marie (easily made by putting boiling water into a saucepan and placing a smaller saucepan inside it so it’s sitting in the hot water) on the hob on the lowest heat, and melt the chocolate and coconut cream together. Give it a stir every few minutes until all the chocolate is melted. Taste it at this point. If it needs to be more chocolatey, sift in the cocoa, so that it doesn’t make lumps. If the mixture needs sweetening (which it probably will unless your dark chocolate is very sweet) add the sugar. Stir for a few more minutes on the hob. Remove from the heat when you’ve got a smooth mixture that tastes right to you.

The next step of the recipe will ensure the mixture stays smooth as it comes down to room temperature.  For this, transfer to a mixing bowl, and whisk vigorously by hand (or equivalent speed in a mixer) for 5 minutes. Cover and leave to cool in the fridge (this speeds up the process), whisking again every 10 minutes or so, as it cools down. This should take about 30–45 minutes.

When the mixture has come down to room temperature, you can add the freeze-dried raspberries, whisk one last time and your work is nearly done. By this point, it should have taken on a slightly lighter colour, and be about the consistency of thick cream. Pour into ramekins, and place in the fridge for a minimum of 20 minutes.

Remove from the fridge just before serving, top with a handful of fresh raspberries and blueberries or other summer fruits, and tuck in!

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Fish baked with olive oil and Indian spices

Before cooking

Before cooking

This is a nice, and flexible, dish. You have only to remember that the fish needs to sit in its spicy coating for an hour or so if it’s going to be really flavourful. Should you not have one of the seasonings, it won’t be a disaster.

In the original recipe (from Meera Taneja’s The Indian Epicure), the fish is fried, but, in my experience, baking gives very tasty and also more presentable results, as the fish doesn’t stick to the pan.

You can use any firm white fillets, fresh or frozen: coley, haddock, hake, ling, pollack, sea bass, or cod, are some of the possibilities.

Serve with, say, an Indian spinach and potato dish, alu sag (see the Book for details). Rice seasoned with cumin goes well too (see the Book for a method).

  • 2 tsp coriander seeds
  • 1 tbsp cumin seeds
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 med onion
  • 1.5 cm piece of fresh ginger
  • 1 green chilli
  • 1 tbsp fresh coriander
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • salt
  • 750 g fish fillets
  • olive oil
  • garam masala
  • 1–2 lemons

The easiest way to make the coating is to whizz the following ingredients to a paste in a food processor: the coriander seeds, the cumin seeds, the roughly chopped garlic, onion, ginger, green chilli, and coriander leaves, the turmeric, and salt to taste. Add a drop of water only if necessary.

If however you are working by hand, heat the seeds to make them easier to pound, and grind them in a pestle and mortar, along with the garlic; grate the onion and ginger; and chop the chilli and coriander leaves finely. Mix all these ingredients together, adding the turmeric and salt.

Rinse and dry the fillets. Arrange them flat in a single layer in a baking dish greased with olive oil. Make two or three diagonal slashes in each fillet and spread the spice mixture all over, pushing it down into the slits. Leave in a cool place for at least an hour.

Pre-heat the oven to gas mark 5/190°C, and sprinkle the fillets with olive oil before placing them in the centre of the oven for 20–25 min.

When the fish is ready, it can be served directly from the baking dish, lightly peppered with garam masala, and with quarters of lemon and accompanying dishes on the side.

Just out of the oven

Just out of the oven

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Dairy-free fruit cake for Christmas, Easter, and in between


This is a delightful and easy cake to produce, and we have added it to our repertoire of dairy-free and egg-free cakes (two others can be found in our book). The present recipe came from the web but has undergone some changes, and there’s plenty of room for further adaptation.

As long as you include some 600 g dried fruit, the proportions of each fruit and the fruit itself can be varied,  dried cranberries or blueberries replacing some of the sultanas, raisins, or currants, for instance. You can be as generous as you like with the (dark or light) glacé cherries and the peel, the latter being better quality when not pre-chopped. You may also want to add more or less of one of the spices, all a matter of taste.

Lard, incidentally, is the traditional fat for fruit cakes, according to The Constance Spry Cookery Book. A vegetable fat is obviously a viable option (we are anyway speaking of only 45 g – one and a half ounces – of which 15 g is for greasing the mould).

This type of cake usually improves with keeping, but I’ve not yet been able to test this!

  • 45 g lard or vegetable fat
  • 150 g candied peel and glacé cherries
  • 1 lemon
  • 360 g plain flour
  • salt
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon powder
  • ½ tsp grated nutmeg
  • 1 tsp mixed spice (quatre-épices in you’re in France)
  • 240 g soft brown sugar
  • 240 g sultanas
  • 240 g raisins
  • 120 g currants
  • ¾ tsp bicarbonate of soda

Pre-heat the oven to gas mark 4/180°C.

Prepare the tin first, greasing it inside with approx 7 g lard or vegetable fat before lining it with paper to 2 cm above the sides and brushing the paper with another 7 g or so melted lard or vegetable fat.

Chop the peel, if necessary, and the glacé cherries, and grate the rind of the lemon.

In a mixing bowl, sift in the flour, a good pinch of salt, and all the spices. Rub in the remaining 30 g lard or vegetable fat and incorporate the sugar.

In a second bowl, mix together the dried fruit, peel, glacé cherries, and lemon rind, before incorporating the fruit mixture thoroughly into the flour. Make a well in the centre and blend in 280 ml cold water.

In a small bowl, pour 2 tbsp warm water over the bicarbonate of soda and when the latter has dissolved, work it into the cake mixture with a light touch.

Pour the mixture into the greased tin and bake in the centre of the oven. After 1 hr turn the temperature down to gas mark 2–3/160°C for a further hour, or longer if required. Test by plunging a skewer deep into the cake: it should come out clean.

Turn the cake out of the tin when it is cool enough to handle and see how long you can keep people off it.

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Guinea-fowl with quince and cider or apple juice


Quinces are hanging off the hedgerows in Provence, so we picked several from an abandoned tree. But apart from making quince jelly, what can you do with them? One answer is to pot-roast a guinea-fowl with one or two. After choosing the best bits of the fruit, we only had about a single quince’s worth. This turned out to be a perfect quantity for flavouring, and, combined with the cider or apple juice, made for a very succulent dish.

The goodly size of the guinea-fowl meant that for two it lasted two evenings (with mushrooms added for the second sitting) and there were still a couple of joints left for a dish with rice (see Olive Oil, Garlic & Parsley – the book for a recipe). A series of lovely meals.

As for the carcass, that was made into a stock (see book for a method) and this became the basis of a tomato and red pepper soup (about which more in a later post).

Chicken or, better still, pheasant could undoubtedly be done in the same way.

  • 1 lge or 2 med onions
  • 2 rashers smoked streaky bacon or pancetta
  • olive oil
  • 1 guinea-fowl, weighing approx 1.5 kg
  • 1 quince
  • 1 bouquet garni: 4–5 sprigs of parsley, 1 bay leaf
  • 1 lge clove of garlic
  • 1 heaped tsp black peppercorns
  • salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 200–300 ml cider or (clear) apple juice
  • 250–300 g mushrooms (optional)

Pre-heat the oven to gas mark 5/190°C.

Peel and cut the onions into eighths or quarters and the bacon or pancetta into strips.

Fry both lightly in a thick casserole (that will hold the guinea-fowl comfortably) in a spoonful of olive oil, transfer with a draining spoon, and reserve.

Brown the guinea-fowl all over in the same oil, having added some if needed. Meanwhile, peel and slice the quince small.

Return the onion and bacon to the pot, along with the quince, the bouquet garni, the garlic, peeled but whole, and the black peppercorns. Season generously with salt and some freshly ground pepper.

Pour in approx 200 ml cider/apple juice, bring to a bubble, cover, and place the casserole in the middle of the hot oven for 45–60 min, checking after 30–40 min whether more cider or apple juice is required and after 50 min whether the bird is already cooked.

Should you be including mushrooms, clean and slice or quarter them (depending on size), sauté them quickly in hot olive oil, and add them to the pot 10–15 min before the end of the cooking time.

Serve the bird on a hot platter with the sauce poured over. It can be carved at the table as the meat will just fall apart.

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A Two-in-One Fish Dish, Well Almost

Fish in the Mediterranean is not plentiful, lots of minnows and small fry, respectable-sized grey mullet at some times of year, and notoriously over-fished tuna. However, you can almost always buy, and apparently without a guilty conscience, coley (lieu noir) or pollack (lieu jaune). When British fishmongers’ slabs buckled under the weight of catches, coley and pollack were somewhat despised, the former being known as cat fish. Nowadays they are still around but better appreciated: supermarkets promote them, and they are used for fish & chips in place of cod.

Both have an agreeable texture and taste and provide steaks and fillets of useful proportions, hence great versatility. Fish and potatoes have no need to prove themselves as a winning combination but this recipe for the two baked together has several virtues: it is easy, quick to prepare (though needs a bit of time in the oven), delicious while not demanding many ingredients, and can provide left-overs (they sound more elegant in French – les restes) that make for delightful fishcakes.

The main recipe is as follows:

Baked fish and (new) potatoes

  • 400–500 g (new) potatoes
  • 2–3 cloves of garlic
  • 1–2 sprigs of rosemary
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds (optional)
  • salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 400 g fish fillets (e.g. coley or pollack or other white fish)
  • ½–1 preserved lemon (optional)

Pre-heat the oven to gas mark 7/220°C.

Scrape or peel the potatoes and cut them into small wedges. Spread these over an oiled ovenproof dish and lightly coat with further olive oil. Add the garlic cloves, peeled but whole, half the rosemary, the fennel seeds, if included, and salt and pepper.

Bake, uncovered, in the centre of the hot oven for 25–30 min, turning the potato over a few times. Now turn the oven down to gas mark 5/190°C and place the fish on top of the potato. Season it with the remaining rosemary, more salt and pepper, and, highly recommended if you can get it, preserved lemon, chopped small. Splash a little oil over the fish, and the potato if necessary. Cook for about 20 min, depending on the thickness of the fish. Serve from the dish. Baked tomatoes go well and can be cooked at the same time as the fish (see Olive Oil, Garlic & Parsley – the book).

For fishcakes next day:

Mash whatever is left over and, if there is not quite enough, boil and add some potatoes. Optionally, half to a whole chopped onion can be worked in as a further binder and enlivener of flavour.

Flouring your hands liberally, press two to three tablespoons’ worth of the mixture into a round flat firm evenly dusted cake, flour your hands again and repeat. Alternatively you can work them together with spatulas.

Brown the fishcakes in hot olive oil, making sure they don’t stick to the pan or you’ll lose the crispy coating that will form.

Serve straightaway, possibly with a sauce rouille and a crunchy salad, green beans with bacon, say, or vegetable, such as carrots with capers (see Olive Oil, Garlic & Parsley – the book).

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